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September 19, 2017
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Cybersafety Resources 
 
http://www.commonsensemedia.org/ is a GREAT resource for parents and teens.  Read parent and teen reviews on videogames, books, apps, and movies.  Parents, stay informed!  For example, take a look at this article: 
 
http://www.connectsafely.org/   What you’ll find here is news, perspective and advice on safe, successful use of social media and technology for parents, kids & teens, educators and policymakers.
 
http://www.aplatformforgood.org/resources  A Platform for Good (PFG) is designed to help parents, teachers, and teens connect, share, and do good online.  This website provides parents and teachers with resources to learn about and interact with new technologies, and encourages good digital citizenship, responsible online behavior, and the use of technology for positive change and making a difference.
 
http://www.nsteens.org/   This website can help teens make safer choices online.  The site includes videos and interactive comics to help navigate options online, and take a stand against cyberbullying.
 
http://www.cybertipline.org/   This resource allows you to report the online exploitation of children/teens which will then be reviewed by local law enforcement.  Or call 1-800-843-5678.
 
www.onguardonline.gov  Resources and practical tips for families to help protect children online, guard against internet fraud, and secure your computers.
 
www.ikeepsafe.org  A coalition of organizations providing tools and guidelines to help children learn the safe use of technology.
 
http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/tech/tec08.shtm  Protecting Kids' Privacy - Tips for Parents
 
 
Anti-Bullying & Harassment Resources
 

Talk to any staff member at school if you are concerned about bullying!  These adults are a good resource at Hull Middle School:

 

Patty Girgis, Principal

Cindy Leach, Assistant Principal
Your teachers
Any Hull staff member
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Are you being bullied?

That can feel pretty awful. You should know you're not alone. That's right ... there are plenty of kids who go through the same things. And, even though you may feel helpless sometimes, there are things you and others can do to help stop the bullying. Give these tips a try. 

Always tell an adult. It's hard to talk about serious things with adults sometimes, but they can help put a stop to bullying. Tell an adult that you trust and can talk to—your parents, your teacher, your school counselor, your coach, your neighbor. If you've told a grown-up before and they haven't done anything about it, tell someone else. And if you're afraid to tell an adult that you have been bullied, get another person—like a friend or a sister or brother—to go with you. Tell the adults exactly what has happened—who did the bullying, where and when it happened, how long it's been happening to you, and how it's making you feel. Ask them what they can do to help stop the bullying.  Most adults really care about bullying and will do everything they can to help you.


Stay in a group. Kids who bully like to pick on kids who are by themselves a lot— it's easier and they're more likely to get away with their bad behavior. If you spend more time with other kids, you may not be an easy "target" and you'll have others around to help you if you get into a difficult situation! 

If it feels safe, try to stand up to the person who is bullying you. If the person who is bullying you thinks you won't do anything about it, they are more likely to keep picking on you. This doesn't mean you should fight back or bully them back. Instead, tell the person bullying you that you don't like it and that they should stop! Keep it simple. You might just say, "Cut it out, Miranda!", and then walk away. If possible, try to talk to them in a calm voice. Kids who bully often like to see that they can make you upset. If you're afraid to talk to the person who is bullying you by yourself, then you might want to ask someone else to be there with you. Kids who bully are more likely to listen, and less likely to bully you, when you're with someone and not alone. If you're not comfortable standing up to someone who has bullied you, that's definitely OK! Just walk away. But be sure to tell an adult. 

If you are being bullied on-line, don't reply. This may actually make the bullying worse. Instead, be sure to tell a family member or another adult you trust. If possible, block any more communications from this person. (For example, it might be a good idea only to accept messages from people you know.) Save evidence of the bullying. If you get a nasty e-mail, print it out or save it so that you can show it to an adult.

Join clubs or take part in activities where you'll meet other kids. Sometimes, it can help to join clubs or take part in activities that interest you. Think about joining a sports team, taking an art class, or joining a scouting group, for example. You can meet other kids who share your interests and you might make some good friends! 

What NOT to do if you are bullied:

 

DON'T...

  • think it's your fault. Nobody deserves to be bullied!
  • fight back or bully a person back. This probably won't make things any better and it might get you into big trouble. Besides, you should try to act better than the person who bullies you.
  • keep it to yourself and just hope the bullying will "go away." It's normal to want to try to ignore bullying and hope that it will stop—or hope that the person will start to pick on someone else. But, often, bullying won't stop until adults and other kids get involved. So, be sure to report the bullying.
  • skip school or avoid clubs or sports because you're afraid of being bullied. Missing out on school or activities that you enjoy isn't the answer. You have a right to be there!
  • think that you're a "tattle tale" if you tell an adult that you've been bullied. Telling is NOT tattling! It's the right thing to do.
  • hurt yourself. Some kids who are bullied get so sad and depressed that they may try to hurt themselves because they think there is nothing else they can do. This definitely isn't the answer. Talk with an adult immediately and tell them how you are feeling. They can help stop the bullying.
 

 

Do you bully others?

Okay, time for the truth. Or at least time to consider if you have a confession to make! Take this quiz to find out if you've ever bullied someone. Put a check in the boxes if you've done these things before.

 

There's a boy or a girl (or maybe more than one) whom you've repeatedly shoved, or punched or physically pushed around in a mean way just because you felt like it.

 

 

You had someone else hurt someone you don't like.

 

 

 

You've spread a nasty rumor about someone, in conversation, in a note, or through email or instant messaging.

 

 

 

You and your friends have regularly kept one or more kids from hanging out or playing with you. Examples: at your lunch table at school, during sports or other activities, or activities that are a part of a club or other kind of group activity.

 

 

 

You've teased people in a mean way, calling them names, making fun of their appearance, or the way they talk or dress or act.

 

 

 

You've been part of a group that did any of these things - even if you only wanted to be part of the crowd.

 

 


If you checked any of these boxes, you're not alone. All over the country, in all types of neighborhoods and schools, there are all types of young people who bully others. Bullying is serious business. It causes young people a lot of pain, and it can affect their ability to do well in school and their general happiness. 

But it doesn't have to be that way. By visiting the website below - and taking a look at the webisodes - you can learn about better ways to treat your friends and acquaintances, as well as become part of the solution to this serious problem!

 

From the Stop Bullying NowWebsite -- http://www.stopbullying.gov/

 

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